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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 133 (some duplicates have been removed)
kicks off his second term with a call for national unity. >> a regional election in germany, a wakeup call for the chancellor. >> and extreme winter weather halts travel across much of northern europe. >> we start this show in washington where president obama balm has publicly taken the oath of office for his second term. he had to take it twice. >> official ceremony held in private on sunday at the white house. now the ceremonial swearing in in front of more than 700,000 people that showed up. >> and an international audience watching on tv. a lot of europeans want to know which way the world's biggest economy is headed and can politicians sort things out. here is a man that thinks he can make a difference the second time around. obama then looked forward to his next and final four years in office calling an end to the politics of division and saying the united states could achieve anything if it acted as one. >> a decade of war is now ending. an economic recovery has begun. america's possibilities are limitless, for we possess all of the qualities this world without boundaries deman
is here at it is about our president. take back the house, elected democrats at every level of government and fight for our values for 100% of the american people. thank you. thank you, madam chair. [applause] >> thank you, secretary. the next item on the committee's agenda is the report from the credentials committee. i'd like to recognize co-chairs to give us an update on this. >> in a. >> thank you, madam chair. on the have of the rest of the potential committee we are honored to present our report. >> the credentials committee received a challenge to the election of dnc members from the state of georgia, and a challenge to the election process used in the election of dnc members from virginia. >> most of these challenges were received in a timely fashion, and reviewed by the credentials committee co-chair. after reviewing each of these challenges, the co-chairs determined that neither of the challenges have merit and the members under challenge were to comment to be properly elected members of the democratic national committee. >> with that, we now recommend to this body the adoption
are coming out on the streets and to vote in an election that matters. >> we'll be live with the latest on the french intervention and where north africa is the new front in the battle against terrorism. and we will be asking why the issue of abortion is still so divided. a special report from mississippi. >> also aaron is taking a look at global unemployment, and that is a huge number, aaron. >> it's a staggering number. 197 million people around the world are now without a jofpblet 13% are under 24. are we creating a generation of non-workers? >> it's 12:00 moon in london, 7:00 a.m. in washington and 2:00 p.m. in jerusalem where more than 5.5 million israeliings are expected to vote? an election that is expected to see benjamin netanyahu return to office. he is facing relidgeous parties and while security seen by many as netanyahu's strong point, the economy has also been a big issue. more from our colleague. >> yes. welcome to jerusalem where we will be broadcasting for the next two days. israel's election. driving to the heart of a sensitive but still stagnant process of peacemaking
will in the future. his surprise showing in the election could make him a key player in coalition talks. flash floods in the andes, supply is contaminated. also in the program, aaron is here with the latest business news. looks like a shy and is coming off of apple? >> we are looking at a shift in the technology world. apple shares bit more than 30% in the last few months. the new iphone is stumbling. the question is this, are the best days of apple behind them? >> it is 7:00 a.m. in washington, 2:00 p.m. in jerusalem, 12 noon in london, where david cameron has said it is time to give the british people a choice about membership in the european union. the prime minister pledged to hold a simple in or out referendum by the end of 2017. but the catch is he may not be prime mr. by then. and there are already plenty of voices in your saying that membership is not like a menu where you get to pick and choose. our political correspondent reports. >> it had been a long time coming, but at last david cameron delivered his big speech in europe. he began with what had gone wrong. not everyone, he said, wanted
only introduced before the election. keeping our promise. taking all of those steps and making sure that energy companies will have to put people on the lowest. that is a record we should be proud of. >> my constituency is enduring something hideous. thanks to the european union. with my right honorable friend remind us that the british economy -- businesses far less able to cope with -- >> my honorable friend is absolutely right. as mrs. are complaining about the burden of regulation. not just from europe, but more generally. that is why we should be fighting in europe for more flexible europe and a europe where received regulations come off. the view of the party opposite is to sit back, do nothing, and never listen to the british people or business minds. >> order. >> you have been watching prime minister's questions from the british house of commons. western time airs live on c- span2 every wednesday at 7:00 a.m. eastern, when the house of commons is in session. and again on sunday nights. watch anytime at c-span.org. you can find video of past prime ministers questions and othe
. but the omens are not good. her coalition has just lost a regional election that was widely viewed as a test of public opinion. >> at first, it looked like the german chancellor's party would win. when the final ballots were counted, it became clear the democrats were on their way out. the results show the coalition of angela merkle's party or one seat behind the opposition. the loss by the christian democrats came about because their supporters tried to vote strategically. usually, christian democrat voters cast a ballot for free democrats. at first, they were thrilled at their score. >> i think it is no surprise some conservatives actually gave us a vote to make sure we would be able to continue with the coalition. >> as the votes were counted, it became clear the political blood transfusion had not work. .- worked how could she continued to help the free democrats across germany without hurting her own party poppies -- party potsies popularity. even her star power was not enough to turn things around. keeping the coalition partner ally came at a heavy price, one she may not want to pay ag
with an election victory. >> did germany's education minister plagiarize her phd? her university launches an investigation. talk about putting a cap amongst the pigeons a day after german and french leaders pledged to deepen e u's economic and monetary union. the british prime minister has signaled his country could want out. >> in a very -- delayed speech, david cameron said he wants to renegotiate the terms of britain's membership and the referendum, but not until the end of 2017. >> that has rattled london's biggest allies and some investors. more uncertainty and possible of people are not what they have been wishing for. >> kamen said he'd campaigned for es you vote, saying he had won the decisions he had -- the concessions he had campaigned on. >> the move had long been anticipated at home and across the european union. david cameron laid out his vision of britain's future. it is one that involves major changes and giving the british public a say in what happens. >> when that referendum comes, let me say now that if we can negotiate such an arrangement, i will campaign for it with al
elections, is thinking fast or has been over the past two weeks of the popularity threshold and angela merkel has been riding and both of their parties are dithering. the sbc slightly inching higher and the sdu inching lower and they're both losing ground in a grander scale. it's the small parties that are the winners, definitely the green wes a record high of over 13%. they're the ones that won the election and lost it for the cdu, not stoeshl democrats themselves. and the liberals, the sdp, many had counted them out and there was an expectation or there was a fear for some that they couldn't even make the century hurdle that you need to get into parliament. they beat that. about you also for the personality ratings and the criticism on a federal scale, but that was his home turf so there was a lot of sympathy vote going in there. the big parties will have to look carefully for coalition partners. the social democrats will try to align themselves with the green that might not be enough. the stronger the greens get, the more the social democrats usually lose and something similar you h
to make sure that we move towards free and fair elections so that there is a legitimate post couey election area -- post-coup government. we have got a short-term challenge in restoring their security. the french, i think, in partnership with the military, are doing a great job. there are longer-term challenges, restoring things. this is what led to the rebellion and the coup in the first place. >> do you think they should be deploying drones? >> we have used drones against al qaeda in pakistan, afghanistan, and other places in the world. i think it is incumbent on us in the senate to make sure we have a framework for when and how we're going to approve the use of drones. i do think they are an important tool in our toolkit to fight back against islamic extremists and to take action against folks who have demonstrated to be a real threat to the united states and our regional allies. >> thank you very much for joining us from capitol hill tonight. >> thank you. >> in other news now, senior officials say that leon panetta, the defense secretary, decided to lift a ban about women in c
democratic elections to take place in the north african country in 1991. when the islamic salvation front won the first round, the government called off the voting and cracked down on islamists, forcing many underground. including a notorious terrorist leader with ties to al qaeda. he is reportedly behind this week's attack on the remote desert gas plant. though he first made a name for himself with a string of violent attacks and dramatic kidnappings after he joined an extremist group in the late 1990's. the terror has continued to this day, but the extremists seemed to be losing support. for many algerians, even an authoritarian regime is preferable to an islamist state. algeria is rich in resources, especially gas and oil. and it has hardly any public debt, but average algerians see little benefit from the country's richest. although there is great dissatisfaction from the government, it has not helped the islamists' cause. there's too much fear the country could once again descend into civil war. >> france is reporting some initial successes in mali where government troops had recaptured
elections. he was asked if the president has met his expectations during the first term. >> he has seen the economy come up again, and the employment -- unemployment rate is still too high but i think this will improve. we're out of iraq and we are changing our policy in afghanistan, and osama bin laden is dead. the president has made a commitment to education and he is running with a 52% approval rate, and this is a good start for a second term. >> what about the critics of the president to say that the deficit has grown and he has not put his weight behind climate change. in his first address, he mentioned climate change three times. and there are still problems in the country and the criticism -- is that he has given a fabulous speech but has not followed through. >> i think some of the criticism is fair but you have to also talk about his initial priorities or challenges. he is really committed to doing something about this in the second term. the deficit is one of the most difficult issues and the president -- he does not sign the appropriation bills until they are passed by congre
netanyahu's right-wing coalition wins a narrow victory in israel's general election. a centrist party makes an unexpected strong showing. >>> welcome to nhk world "newsline." experts following the move buys north korea are watching the clock. they say it's only a matter of time before the country carries out another nuclear test. north korean leaders promised to boost their military power in reaction to a u.n. security council resolution condemning their recent rocket launch. security council members passed the resolution unanimously. it expands existing sanctions, adding four individuals and six organizations, including the space agency. assets will be frozen and the individuals will also face a travel ban. officials in pyongyang are showing defiance. >> this suggests north korean authorities are prepared to conduct a third nuclear tests following ones in 2006 and 2009. they also declared they will no longer recognize a joint statement in 2005 from the six party talks on their nuclear development. that includes plans for the country to abandon all nuclear weapons and programs. officials fr
terrorists. >> elections had been planned for april. that is now completely up in the air. even if the military intervention is a short one, mali is likely to remain politically unstable for some time to come. >> coming up, floods are causing havoc in the indonesian capital. >> first, here's a look at some of the news. >> syrian activists are reporting a new massacre by government forces. the syrian observatory for human rights says pro-assad troops killed more than 100 civilians on tuesday. witnesses are reported as saying troops hunting rebel fighters slotted entire families, including women and children -- slaughtered entire families including women and children. >> new demands come as pakistan's chief anti- corruption official refused the supreme court order to a rust -- arrest the prime minister over lack of evidence. m in the u.s. president's gun control proposals face an uncertain future. there's no majority in either house of congress with resistance from both republicans and democrats. gun supporters have also launched an advertising campaign against obama's move. the p
elections of lower saxony is busy choosing their parliament and the result is looking extremely close. it is being seen as a dress rehearsal for several elections in september and a verdict on chancellor angela merkel herself. david mcalester represents her party and is close to her. the poll suggests is neck-and- neck with the opposition social democrats and the green party. with go live now to hand over. what is the latest you are hearing there? >> the latest we are hearing is that it's going to be a long night. we will have to wait for the regional polling stations to be counted. the parties are really neck-and- neck and it could be angela merkel's christian democratic union or it could be the greens and social democrats. this is a bellwether region. this has farmers, big industry, europe's biggest automaker, volkswagen is located here. the religious split is catholic and protestant. what happens here is will what happened across the country generally speaking. that is why angela merkel made seven campaign stops here along with david mcallister, the christian democratic premier in
were reelected in the general election here in 2015, it would be part of their mandate and the platform that there would offer the british people and in-out referendum around 2018. so five years from now. the great concern of this, even if there is agreement in the european union, the great concern is that now a leading prime minister from a leading european country has said the sellout and other european countries might follow suit. the worry in big european capitals like paris and berlin is whether this will be criticized and if europe will only be as strong as its most skeptical parts. and the worry is that europe might start to collapse from the outside in words. so i don't think that they will take this speech very kindly one bit. i certainly don't think that they will want to acknowledge the kind of change that mr. chairman has said is necessary. >> israel's prime minister and his right-wing bloc has done worse than expected in parliamentary elections. benjamin netanyahu is coming victory. now he has to negotiate with other fiscal parties to form a broader coalition. >> i am proud
election-year in austria, meaning that voters will go to the polls several times. regional parliaments are due to be elected in four of the country's states this spring, followed by the national election of the federal parliament this autumn. it will not be an easy campaign for the traditional parties. they face competition from a political newcomer. some austrian politicians are reminded of a time in the early 1990's when a man came from the far right and meddled with the traditional austrian political landscape. he died four years ago, and his party has since lost some of its significance, but some former supporters have now found a new political home with a new party. >> he who has the gold makes the rules -- that was the model used when introducing the party in the timber. he was born into a poor family in austria but went to canada to make his millions. now he has returned to make a dramatic entrance on the political scene. >> i am certain that this is a very important day that will go down in austrian history. i also think it will go down in the history of the world. >> the recen
-than-expected showing in tuesday's elections. near-final totals showed his bloc and its allies had only 60 of 120 seats in parliament. netanyahu signaled he'll reach out to a new centrist party that made a strong showing. it favors a new focus on making peace with the palestinians. this was election day in jordan. voters cast ballots in the country's first parliamentary elections since the arab spring. the new legislature will have more power, including the ability to choose the next prime minister. some two million people were eligible to go to the polls. turnout estimates varied from a high of 56% to as low as 47% as the day went on. several islamist groups boycotted, saying the election was stacked against them. but the prime minister dismissed their actions. >> ( translated ): the weakness of the turnout, if it exists, and i am not saying that, nobody should think that it is because of the boycott. it is not correct. otherwise anyone would think if there was any hesitation for the elections it's because people were neither convinced with past elections nor with the performance of the past parliamen
are up for re-election in north carolina or out west or down south or wherever they're from, i don't think he can lift it. and can that's what i'm talking about in terms of overreach. if this was something where you said close the loophole on gun shows, catch the 40% of people who are going into the shows and escaping, buying guns if they're mentally disturbed and we should catch that and reasonable restrictions. the problem in the heller case and what d.c. was doing is they said you couldn't have a gun unless you registered it, but then today wouldn't let you register it. i mean, that's an effective you can't do it. and that does, in fact, go too far. so if it's a common sense -- and, you know, quite frankly, i don't know why ten. i don't know why somebody needs ten bullets, let alone thirty. so ten doesn't seem like some magic number to me. and, again, to the gun owners, that sounds like something somebody made up, ten. so i think that the president'stive orders -- executive orders can be accepted by the republican party, and if they did the incremental approach of background che
banks are putting in. we're through the u.s. elections, ahead of the debt ceiling debate. in some sense there isn't an immediate crisis. it's a question now whether ceos can get through the real economic fundamentals. in some ways we're betwiked and between, kelly. >> i like the scarf, ross. >> yeah. that's the point. look, there's plenty to come on our coverage today. let me recap some of the people we're going to be talking to. john lipinski, formerly of the imf. and hamish tyrwhitt, construction group out of australia. we saw rates dip a little today. suggesting there's room to cut rates. and the executive dean of peking university. we're more relaxed about china, more relaxed than three or four months ago. we'll get the inside there. all of that is coming up on today's "worldwide exchange." how are the markets looking? >> perfect. we'll check the markets in a second. i want to bring news out of the bank upon spain saying fourth quarter gdp was down 1.not -- 1.7% drop, it was .6 drop. pretty large. and 2012 gdp down 1.3%, down from a contraction of 0.4% in 2011. more difficult news f
election. but one year later, military forces carried out a coup on the grounds they were protecting the republican system. >> translator: algerian history has a precedent for terrorist tactics leading to victory. in the case of the war of independence against france. so in a sense there's a kind of justification for terrorism. and at the same time there's the idea of never surrendering in the face of terror coming from the enemy. >> reporter: the civil war claimed the lives of 200,000 people. it involved indiscriminate bombings and widespread human rights violations. the president was elected for the first time in 1999. he was re-elected in 2004 and 2009. he chose to deal with militant groups in two ways. he invited them to lay down their weapons to participate in rebuilding the nation. and at the same time he continued cracking down on their activities. observers say this approach has gained broad support amongst the public. >> translator: the government was afraid that negotiating with the kidnappers and making concessions could lead to a loss of legitimacy. so from the historical
allies have won election in tuesday's israeli elections. he will get a third term as president but his power is diminished after his party lost about 11 seats. >>> also overseas this morning, british prime minister david cameron made a critical speech on the uk's rocky relationship with the eu. cameron proposed a bold referendum to allow british voters to decide whether or not to exit the alliance by 2016. >> there's no doubt we're more powerful than washington, delhi because we're a powerful player inside the union that matters for british jobs, and security. it matters to our ability to get things done in the world. it matters to the united states and other friends around the world, which is why many tell us clearly they want britain to remain in the european union. if we left the european union, it would be a one-way ticket, not a return. >>> let's take an early look at the markets. we'll get all up in your business this morning. steve sedgwick is live in london, which is still at this hour firmly part of the european union. >> and set to be for a bit longer. there was a huge caveat
. to gender quotas exist for increasing women elected to government bodies? at a public education programs conducted by the state to emphasize the importance of balance representation in all elected bodies and so on? i condemned they are not universal human rights. they have little to do with equality of opportunity. they're they are essentially a partisan political positions of western progressives of the western left. come off as universal human rights. in the u.n. monitoring committee to france in 2000 make company said you're doing a good job unpolitical pairing. 50% of candidates for municipal elections is good. but you don't have 50% of women on corporate boards or financial institutions. surveys suggest instituting financial sanctions against companies that did not address these differences. the u.n. committee went to germany 2004, demanded that the federal government had conduct a study on my fathers are not without and to parental leave. it's not just a state policy. it's a national policy. there's not many men taking advantage. why is in a quick sweat as you and start having a qu
as it does today in which very important election held in israel or following the inaugural of president obama and the testimony of secretary clinton. that's a con fluns of events unimaginable, but here it is. does this country seem to be projecting a certain knowledge of its interests and a clear set of policies that make sense to the rest of the world whether it be the middle east, north africa, europe, or asia? >> the government is delusional with issues related to islamist, islamist supremists. we had told again and again that the muslim brotherhood are different than al-qaeda. they are moderates. they are evolved. they are people we can work with. yet, look at the bottom line here. who wants the blind shake back? the demands being made again and again for the release of the terrorist we convicted in the 1990s of atrocities against the united states. the brotherhood and al-qaeda wants him back. what does the brotherhood do as soon as they get into power? impose sharia, what they said they would do and what al-qaeda wants to do. lou: at the very same time while egypt is in increasingl
first election. he's my date this weekend. >> very nice. i'll see you at the balls. thanks again, star. appreciate it. so kate, got everybody out here. we've got personalities, advocates, politicians, you fame it. folks are coming out, signing up to volunteer, participate, and a lot of folks are attracting them to the tent. >> absolutely. a lot going on the mall today. thank you, suzanne. we'll continue to track all of the events taking place this inauguration weekend but we want to get caught up on other stories making headlines today. john? >> we'll start overseas now. algeria, seven hostages and 11 kidnappers are reported dead today. algerian superb forces had been trying to secure the release of an unknown number of people including americans being held at this gas plant by an al qaeda-linked terror group. lance armstrong admits he cheated and admits he deserved to be punished. the disgraced cyclist told oprah winfrey he does feel remorse for what he did and says cheating cost him sponsorships word about $75 million. he could lose a lot more as sponsors and supporters sue to get so
elections and let's come together. the best thing for them to do is to get on with it. we are a progressive country and we need to be progressive in our thinking. host: do you think the questions by republicans were fair or too tough? caller: especially my representative from south carolina, joe wilson, the man who called the president a liar and the other representatives from south carolina. they want to be stuck in the past and they aren't thinking progressively and that's where this country is headed. host: the new chairman of the committee is ed royce of california. and one of his questions for secretary clinton was why weren't the -- why were the security forces withdrawn from benghazi. and here's what she had to say. >> there's a lot of important questions in that, mr. chairman. and let me begin by saying that i was aware of certain incidents at our facility and the attack on the british diplomat. i was briefed on steps taken to repair the breach in the perimeter wall after the june bombing. steps taken to reduce off-compound violence. others did not recommend based on those incidents
thought the rest of the u.s. >> the republican party who is elected to control the congress the same time as obama was elected are going to cross their arms and they are not going to raise the debt ceiling ultimately unless they get severe spending cuts and the obama administration is not going to give it to them. and you are going to watch the u.s. do crazy, crazy things this year. >> if you are right on those crazy, crazy things, then the rest of us are in for a dreadful, dread full time? >> dreadful. it is going to be so strange for the richest country on earth to cross their arms and say i'm not paying. imagine crossing your arms. you are going to see it this year. >> reporter: now, we have been asking our guests here for the riskometer. on this side we have is the u.s. a bigger threat to global growth in 2013. on this side the e.u. lutnic thinks the u.s. is by far the bigger. as you look overall most people still seem to believe europe is the biggest threat in 2013. by the way, speet tweet me wher think the biggest threat is. >> very official looking. did you make that yourself? >> d
. to hithe legislature, letting tm know where he stand on it. lou: as you should, you are an elected official as well as sheriff of the county. >> correct, being sheriff is a unique position, only elected law enforcement official in the country. lou: and the sheriffs play a vital role in law enforcement, most people know and are appreciative of. you have expressed concerned about the executive orders of the president, you have concerns about number 6, says public a letter from atf to federally licensed gun dealers providing guidance on how to run background checks on private sellers, they were pretty well prepared if are that letter, weren't they? >> i believe so, that will require a lot more explanation on their part. if that indicates that they are pursuing, prohibiting private sale and transfer, among private parties it will be interesting how they approach that. lou: this is a letter from the justice department, saying, to all who hold licenses, federal firearm licenses, that they are going to be engaged in providing background checks, going to the national background check system of the
in congress. >> the president's approval ratings are higher than at any time since he was first elected. >> and the polls are with the prident. but you make the most important point. nra has had this game all to themselves. they have been able to play it with no money in the game, on the side of people who wanted some sense of gun safety. now with people like gabby giffords, people who can attract funds and target them strategically i think the game is -- >> the president has the national -- we have more power than nra but i believe you were right from the standpoint and being a person who makes law people should come to ts table find out what they do agree on instead of politicizing it. it is a political issue. i think leaders should come together and stop the bipartisan -- with enyou have the nra saying we're against an assault weapons ban, against everything. to me the nra has become nothing more than a shield for the gun manufacturers. if you find out where their finances are coming it's true. they get their membership dues for sure but they get huge monies from gun manufacturers. t
corrupted by the athens. it is an f. us that aims for at political and social elected us in on the one hand, and moral anarchy on the other. you cannot win, but they can make us all losers. to meditate on the meaning of this great contest, we've assembled a distinguished panel of chambers intellectual and moral affairs. you berkowitz is the current senior fellow at the hoovery/ institution where he chairs theo hoover task force on national security and law, and co-chairsk the hoover task force on the virtues of a free society. in the past he served as an associate professor at george mason university school of law, and an assistant and associate professor at harvard university. he is the author of virtue and the making of modern liberalism. he holds a jd and a ph.d inñs political science from thisvç institution, an m.a. from hebrew university of jerusalem, and a ba in english literature from swarthmore college. norman podhoretz -- i feel silly introducing these people -- norman podhoretz served as editor-in-chief of "commentary" magazine from 1960-1995, and is their current editor at larg
honorable friend he was in that referendum was very much part of his manifesto of the last election. [shouting] >> in the interest of harmony i think we'll leave that to one side. >> mr. speaker, a constituent of mine with a chronic medical condition tells me that he is just 20 pounds a week to spend on food and clothing after paying his utility bills, and after april after the welfare cuts in april, he will just have to pounds a day. if the prime minister police we're all in it together, with the agreed to review the impact on the very poorest of the welfare cuts so that my constituents sacrifices are in line with his own? >> i will look very close to what the honorable gentleman says and the circumstances. let me just make the point, if you compare 2013 with 2010 in terms of the level of key benefits, it is worth making this point. and unemployed person on jobseeker's allowance is getting 325 pounds more this year than in 2010. a couple jobseeker's allowance, 500 pounds more. a single out of work mother, 420 pounds more to do with the opposition try and do, week after week, is som
at the next election, there will be a general referendum on britain's future in the european union. he outlined the new relationships in europe. this is a little bit more than 40 minutes. >> i would like to thank limburg for hosting this this morning. this morning i would like to talk about the future of europe. but first let us remember the past. seven years ago, europe was being torn apart by a catastrophic conflict. the skies of london lit by flames night after night. millions dead across the world in the battle for peace and liberty. as we remember the sacrifice, so we should also remember how the shift in europe for more to sustain peace came about. it didn't happen like a change in the weather. it happened because of determined work over generations and a commitment to friendship and the resolve never to revisit that dark past. a commitment epitomized by the treaty found 50 years ago this week. after the berlin wall came down, i visited that city and i will never forget it. the abandoned checkpoints in the sense of excitement about the future. the knowledge that a great continent
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 133 (some duplicates have been removed)